The Guru at The Top of The Mountain

  Image source: Michael Maslin

Image source: Michael Maslin

Many of the old mythology and stories around finding enlightenment talk of a guru sitting in meditation at the top of a mountain. Mere mortals, who have not become enlightened, follow their hero’s journey to scale this summit and ask the sacred guru their one question, to learn the meaning of life through the guru’s enigmatically sparse answer.

Times are changing, and we are no longer in the age of the guru; enlightenment is no longer reserved for only a handful, as masses of the human population are experiencing awakenings and rapidly launching into hyper-reality which, in an instant or even over the course of a few days or months, can bring one to the state that was anciently known as enlightenment. And while we still need help to find our way through this maze, we no longer reserve the status of guru to a few chosen beings. It is within us all; we become it consciously.

For a while – or for some, the rest of their lives – our awakening spawns a fearful need to change the world. Talk of conspiracy theories, doom, and gloom, and all the fun-house aspects of the fourth dimension take our attention. But this is merely a sign of what is within – our shadow work still needs to be dealt with if we see the world surrounding us as in danger, or needing to change. If we are still in fear and the need to change or control, we are not yet unified within. our vision of truth needs to expand.

In a highly complex universe that is based on energy, there can be no wrong. To believe that it is possible to create an error shows that we must expand our understanding of the workings of the All. Truly, the universe is so complete and quantum that it cannot be “broken”.
— The Era of The True Creator

The fun part in our journey comes when we have integrated the knowledge of enlightenment, released the shadow stories, and are able to see beyond the duality to embrace All. This is where play begins. we appreciate, love, and embrace the human experience for all that it is, and learn that even our perceived pain and suffering is a joy – a ravishingly delicious and all-encompassing experience to have.  The joy of simply being human becomes indescribably fulfilling.

We have climbed the mountain already, and have seen the view from the top. And NOW, maybe we want to hike around a bit! Maybe we want to have a picnic or even build a house on the hillside, which we find just as beautiful as the top summit. Because we have been to the top of the mountain and we know experientially that it exists, what it feels like in our bodies, we know that we can go there at any time we choose. And just as in the story of Siddhartha, maybe after all that we've come to know, we want to be a ferryman.

Of course this is a symbolic explanation – there is no summit to reach, no end to our journey, even in ascension. But what I am trying to show here is that we come to a point where our desire for continued growth guides us to let go of the linear model of what our ascension process can look like. We cease to be confined to the idea of ascension being a one-way trajectory, a teleological journey.

Ascension becomes Expansion.

Expansion involves being multidimensional in our scope of our experience. We are not just “going up” as we may be thinking, but are integrating the full experience of life, and exploring whatever aspects we choose. This is not a path of renunciation of the human experience, but PLAY within it. The path of the True Creator is one of embracing All That Is, and knowing new viewpoints and creative pursuits within it.

Play allows us the creative human experience without the confines of dualistic judgment. Through play, we continue our expansion with ecstatic joy in the journey, no matter what it looks like.